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Art & Architecture: Marcin Sacha / interview

The present art world is influenced by continued image-bombing. Where we, as mere spectators, are immersed. Anytime we go through the media searching for what is new or what has been done inside art, we realise that there are more and more flanks, fields and levels where art is continually developing itself.  Away from the closed circles of the art market system, the number of amateur artists that rise and take a spot in our visual culture increases every day.

Some of these artists are here just to reconsider the relationship between humanity and the world, emphasizing on the defamiliarization we daily go through with daily realities. These seem to evolve faster than our reasoning or our perception. From this point, Marcin Sacha, an amateur photographer from Tarnow, Poland, shows in his work as a strange world full of this black spots, or ‘gaps’, in the understanding process. Educated as a geophysicist, he turned to Photography in order to show us a world that can be both scarily dangerous and transcendentally beautiful. The process he goes through is to interact with defamiliarized architecture and materials – which he also uses to create graphic effects and illusions of space allow a whole picture to turn into a view of fantasy.

Marcin Sacha’s name might not ring a bell yet, but his breath-taking landscape photographs and his graphic creations are lately taking attention within the Internet web.

Personally, when in front of any picture of Marcin Sacha I feel caught by a sense of nostalgia – nostalgia for to return as the prodigal son; nostalgia for the return to this place we once called ‘ours’ and now it is nothing more than a stage in ruins.

He has taken part in both online and physical exhibitions. Here, he has been awarded several times with gold medals and honour mentions. However, his photographic style has not been consistent during the length of his career. Starting as a landscape photographer, he ended up close to graphic design, always following his theme of ‘creating the space’.

I see no better way to appraise his work than by making this short interview about his career.

Healing Architecture / The hospital-garden that helps healing

It would be hard to remember how many times I have wondered if there was a straight relationship between human behavior and architecture, if there is a direct relationship between the shape of the space and how we get along in the atmosphere that this space evokes.

Unfortunately, along my architecture studies, I haven’t found topics related to this, what is today called neuro-architecture, so I had to wait until I was done with school to fetch the chance to research and go deeper in this wonderful field.

Therefore, I spend my spare time looking for examples that demonstrate this invisible buttangible relationship between space and spectator. Let me explain. There are scientific evidences regarding this connection between what we do and how we do it, but few of these evidences have been taken as principles to design spaces. Moreover, we are nowadays analyzing spaces that show this connection as today’s example.

Few months ago, I ran into the Prouty Garden, part of the Children Hospital of Boston. A place that is said to help young patients heal, giving us a great example of this link between neuroscience and architecture (landscape architecture in this particular case).

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Courtesy by http://www.saveprouty.org

A life / Melnikov House

Cortesía de Do.Co.Mo.Mo

Arbat, residential district of Moscow, 1927. The Russia of change. After the Russian Revolution in 1917, and with Bolshevik ruling the Soviets under Lenin’s command, the USSR is born. This new Soviet Union would get entangled in the web of totalitarianism when, in 1927, an all power-possessing ruler arises: the ascension of Stalin dramatically defined the transformation of Soviet society, sculpting a new face of the country, characterised by collectivisation and industrialisation.

In such a political and social context, architecture, the main channel of propaganda and subliminal messages throughout history, wasn’t left aside. The revolutionary vanguards, waving the banner of constructivism, were imbued with an aesthetic search for provocative, free forms and functionality and found themselves blinded by a new wave of architecture.

In the middle of this landscape, the Melnikov house was built, home for the last 45 years to the architect Konstantin Stepanovich Melnikov. This work would be a turning point in the life of the artist: his own home became his most renowned and appraised masterpiece, but also his most bitter.

Housing property déjà vu / A Spanish woman in Chile

© Ana Asensio Rodríguez

“I’ve already experienced this”

And not in a dream, of that I’m sure. I saw dismal, concrete monstrosities turning cities and the look of their dwellers grey. I saw streets changing, beaches disappearing. I saw all of this recently and it all happened too fast.

They called it the ‘Property Bubble’; it happened in Spain. Now I live in a different country, on a different continent. An amazing Chile bathed by the Pacific, embraced by the Andes, decorated with lakes, deserts and glaciers. A growing Chile, expanding day by day built around its super metropolis, Santiago.

I wake up every morning, next to the windows, and I see cranes lifting walls of concrete with the ease of birds making their nests; window-holed walls that cover the great mountain, which twinkle through the night with the lights of their new inhabitants. Their new and mortgage-indebted inhabitants.  

IFAC: a romance between art and architecture.

© Ana Asensio Rodríguez #IFAC2015

© Ana Asensio Rodríguez #IFAC2015

Sometimes you get to meet people who fill you with energy and electricity — fleeting, intense crossroads full of shared views and beautiful ideas. Spontaneous connections, which however tiny, will remain with you for a very long time.

Sometimes, these crossroads are not between people, but between arts, crafts, talents and experiences. Among these intersections is the inevitable attraction between art and architecture: explosive collages, a romance drunk with imagination. And, on very few occasions these two types of crossroads occur at the same time. And in those moments you can only hope that it will happen again.

It’s called IFAC, the International Festival of Art and Construction. It is a 10-day long celebration that brings together more than 300 people from all over the world – creatively restless individuals, who meet somewhere in the European countryside. I felt immeasurably lucky to be one of those 300 people, and so I wanted to share how fascinating IFAC is from the inside.